Myth Busters
Myth 1
Myth 1 Correct Answer
Myth 1 Incorrect Answer
Myth 2
Myth 2 Correct Answer
Myth 2 Incorrect Answer
Myth 3
Myth 3 Correct Answer
Myth 3 InCorrect Answer
Myth 4
Myth 4 Correct Answer
Myth 4 InCorrect Answer
Myth 5
Myth 5 Correct Answer
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Get the truth about healthy living.

Is eating gluten products bad for you? Not necessarily. Explore this and other common health and wellness-related myths by taking this true/false quiz.

All products that contain
gluten are bad for you.

True False

Incorrect

The gluten typically found in wheat isn’t bad for you – in fact, dieticians recommend a balanced diet with whole grains. However, if you are allergic or sensitive to gluten, or have celiac disease, then doctors recommend you avoid gluten products entirely.

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Correct

The gluten typically found in wheat isn’t bad for you – in fact, dieticians recommend a balanced diet with whole grains. However, if you are allergic or sensitive to gluten, or have celiac disease, then doctors recommend you avoid gluten products entirely.

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You have to exercise at least 30 minutes at a time for it to do any good.

True False

Correct

To get the health benefits of exercise, it’s recommended you get 30 minutes of exercise daily – but it doesn’t have to be all at once! You can break it up into three 10-minute sessions or two 15-minute sessions. Aim for 30 minutes of activity at least five times a week.

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Incorrect

To get the health benefits of exercise, it’s recommended you get 30 minutes of exercise daily – but it doesn’t have to be all at once! You can break it up into three 10-minute sessions or two 15-minute sessions. Aim for 30 minutes of activity at least five times a week.

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It’s okay to reuse plastic water bottles, as long as you rinse them out.

True False

incorrect

Just rinsing the bottle with plain water isn’t good enough. Since bacteria can linger at the mouth of a water bottle, it’s important to wash by hand after each use with hot soapy water and use a bottle cleaner to get into the neck of the bottle – just as you would with any eating utensils.

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Correct.

Just rinsing the bottle with plain water isn’t good enough. Since bacteria can linger at the mouth of a water bottle, it’s important to wash by hand after each use with hot soapy water and use a bottle cleaner to get into the neck of the bottle – just as you would with any eating utensils.

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The best way to avoid spreading
germs is to cover your mouth
when you cough.

True False

Correct

The best way to prevent the spread of germs and stay healthy is through good hygiene and frequent hand washing. When coughing, try to catch the germs in the corner of your elbow so you don't transfer germs onto your hands. Germs lurk on all types of surfaces, including doorknobs, handrails, and more, so it’s best to wash your hands after exposure to shared surfaces.

Next

Incorrect

The best way to prevent the spread of germs and stay healthy is through good hygiene and frequent hand washing. When coughing, try to catch the germs in the corner of your elbow so you don't transfer germs onto your hands. Germs lurk on all types of surfaces, including doorknobs, handrails, and more, so it’s best to wash your hands after exposure to shared surfaces.

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The FDA is required to approve
dietary supplements for safety
and effectiveness.

True False

Incorrect

Unlike drug products that must be proven safe and effective for their intended use, the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) is not required to approve dietary supplements, such as ginseng, gingko bilboa, and more. Use dietary supplements with caution, especially if you take prescription or over-the-counter medications.

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Correct

Unlike drug products that must be proven safe and effective for their intended use, the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) is not required to approve dietary supplements, such as ginseng, gingko bilboa, and more. Use dietary supplements with caution, especially if you take prescription or over-the-counter medications.

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For more information on healthy living topics, visit:

www.cdc.gov/HealthyLiving/

Please note: All content is intended for educational purposes only and is not intended to serve as medical advice.